11 Replies Latest reply: Jun 5, 2011 1:35 AM by globaltreker RSS

Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma

sirray Platinum
Currently Being Moderated

I'm an independent consultant who travels extensively on client engagements. Since my hotel stays are paid for by the clients, they require me to book with their corporate rates. I know I'm supposed to present work ID associated with that corporate rate upon check in. However, since I'm a consultant, I'm seldom issued a work ID by my clients.

With that said, I've never been asked to present work ID when checking in. I was told that the front desk is never supposed to ask for my ID anyway since I'm a platinum premiere member. However, I was asked for a work ID today when I checked in to a Renaissance. After much explaining, I was able to convince them. However, I'm interested in how others like me have been dealing with this. If someone from Marriott reads this, please respond also. Thanks

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    versel Alumni Steward Platinum
    Currently Being Moderated

    I'm in the same situation. Like you, I'm almost never asked for ID. On the rare occasion where I am asked for it upon check in, I tell them that it's my first week and that if they give me the hotel fax number, I'll have someone from HR fax something over.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    Alumni Steward Platinum 8 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    I have always been asked for an ID when getting a room rate less than the going rate. Now, I have been also asked to show my proof of identification (driver's license, etc.) as well as my CC. Must be unique to CA?

     

    In the small print of the reservation page when you book online it says, "ID required.  If no ID prevailing rate will be applied." (or something along those lines.)

     

    Anyone else see this in their travels?

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    shoeman1000 Platinum 4 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    California does ask for ID always.  so does Las vegas.  Much of the rest of the country (that I visit) seems to be happy just to check me in.  Sometimes they will ask for my credit card, other times they don't.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    nuhusker Platinum 2 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    I show my ID for the special rate at the same time I give my CC to the desk clerk.  Why should they have to ask when I know it's a condition of the reservation?  Personally, I'd like to see them ask for ID from every person checking in, if for no other reason to make sure the CC and the user are one in the same.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    nhtraveler Platinum 3 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    SirRay - I qualify for either a government rate or the AAA rate (and use whichever results in a lower room rate) and usually automatically show my ID upon check-in. The times that I've forgotten to do so, I'd say I'm asked for it about 50% of the time.

    A friend of mine who does work for various police departments as an independent contractor is in the same boat as you. She has addressed it by getting a signed letter from one of the departments verifying that she is a contractor working for a government agency, and having it addressed to the Marriot at which she will be staying. She told me that it works about 75% of the time.

    nhtraveler

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    Segments Platinum 4 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    I automatically provide driver's license and CC as ID.  Used to be asked for the drivers's license so often it has become automatic.  Unless it is a location I frequent, the desk clerk usually quickly confirms that the ID photo matches my face and name matches the reservation.

    In some areas it may be the law, but in general it is a safety protocol.   Ensures hotel staff knows who is staying in hotel, especially non-public room access in case there is an incident.  Also assures that someone else doesn't falsify my identity for fradulent CC charges or to claim nights when it's not me actually staying. 

    I've rarely been asked to show my AAA card or never my business ID.  Maybe as a fulltime employee they can see I only book under one company discount code?

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    pingreeman Platinum 1 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    I am also in the same situation. Usually, I am able to simply explain that I am an independent contractor and was told to use the client's corporate rate. Rarely does it go further, but then, Versel has a great answer.

     

    PS - I have negotiate rates even better than my client for long-term engagements.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    iestrikesback Platinum 44 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    I also qualify for both Government and AAA rates, but it's pretty rare that I'm asked to show those IDs (maybe 10% of the time).  However, I'll always show my Driver's License upon check-in.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    kahunapremier Platinum
    Currently Being Moderated

    There really isn't any consistency at Marriott's as I rarely get asked to show ID, and sometimes I show my license. When I did contract work (over 12 years) I always had a ID for the company I was working with, that was standard operating producure be it for CORP or GOV work.

    Recent trips in California from SFO to SJC to LAX, NEVER once asked for ID, Very inconsistent.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    mikiegfla Platinum 4 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    Same here. I've been asked for ID on occasion and couldn't supply it because I was a consultant. Most of the time I was able to talk my way into getting the front desk to honor the rate.

     

    For what it's worth, whenever I reserve using the AAA rate, I've never been asked to produce my card - not once in two decades.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Work ID as proof of rate eligibility dilemma
    globaltreker Platinum
    Currently Being Moderated

    I just give them the name and phone number of my client sponsor so they can contact and verify my identity.  They are the ones paying for the bill anyways, so they are the most motivated to ensure you get a good rate.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...