4 Replies Latest reply: Jun 3, 2009 5:32 PM by tjcnewyork RSS

Rollover policy unfair

lyonswife Platinum
Currently Being Moderated

Hello!  I am a Platinum member who has been a loyal Marriott Rewards member for 3 years and a customer for longer than that.  I just found out that the policy where Marriott rolls over nights is what I would consider unfair to Gold and Platinum members.  Basically, a Silver member starts having their nights rolled over to next year once they earn 10 nights.  However, Gold and Platinum members start having nights rolled over once they reach 50 and 75 nights.  So I spend many, many more thousands of dollars this year and drive just a little farther out of my way (just to stay at a Marriott), but I could potentially get no nights rolled over just because of my status from last year?

This makes no sense to me in terms of Marriott's loyalty to it's most loyal customers. If someone is able to explain it to me, I would really appreciate it.

Have a great day!

(For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Rollover policy unfair
    Alumni Steward Platinum 8 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    If this were a permanent thing I would agree that it favors the folks who reach Silver Status, but remember that it appears to be an attempt to sweeten the pot for everyone.  As someone who has turned back hundreds of nights over the last three years I see it as valuable for me at least.

     

    And as you may know getting a Marriott Visa will give you 15 free nights per year for the cost of the card--and a free night at select hotels.  

     

    Marriott obviously wants the Rewards program to succeed with the three levels of loyal customers.  Rolling over nights is an idea worth trying and if it fails, then so be it.

     

    Hopefully, the powers that be will evalute the benefits and costs of the program when the year ends and decide whether the program of rolling over nights should be continued. 

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Rollover policy unfair
    tjcnewyork Platinum
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hi Stepping

     

    "Marriott obviously wants the Rewards program to succeed with the three levels of loyal customers.  Rolling over nights is an idea worth trying and if it fails, then so be it."

     

    Based upon Insiders discussion and elsewhere on the web, Elite Rollover Nights plus Double Nights promises to be extremely successful for Marriott Rewards and Elite.  I hope the powers-that-be consider extending this benefit indefinitely and consider counting Redeemed Nights towards EQN. (Elite Qualifying Nights)

     

    That said, Lyonswife raises a valid concern about customer loyalty, IMO.  My response to Lyonswife may be found here.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Rollover policy unfair
    Alumni Steward Platinum 8 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    NY:

     

    I would be surprised if the idea took hold and was continued--perhaps after the assessment of the number of people making the three levels is done, Marriott will consider either moving the levels farther apart (making Platinum something much more special than Gold, which it is actually is not), and perhaps moving the requirements to make each level up a few nights. 

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Rollover policy unfair
    tjcnewyork Platinum
    Currently Being Moderated

    SS

    "I would be surprised if the idea took hold and was continued--perhaps after the assessment of the number of people making the three levels is done, Marriott will consider either moving the levels farther apart (making Platinum something much more special than Gold, which it is actually is not), and perhaps moving the requirements to make each level up a few nights."

     

    In the 2008 economy, spending 75 nights or more on the road was tenable.  In 2009's economy, it's just tough to justify. So, my hunch is that rather than toughen up requirements -even more- and alienate a fairly large number of loyal customers, Marriott's strategy is to expand the ranks of the Elite to develop resiliency that will keep business going until the economy improves.  

     

    It's an excellent strategy, IMO.

     

    Elite Rollover Nights plus Double Nights combined with the Global Rate Break and other promotions will help Marriott get there. Maintaining the Marriott Rewards Program is very co$tly as it is. Upping the requirements to create more exclusivity will add cost.  Pumping more to make Platinum Elite harder to reach doesn't sound practical when companies are losing headcount, consolidating and dissolving. 

     

    Lyonswife is on-point. It was really tough to stretch budget to make Platinum in 2008.  Through no fault of her own, the economy tanked and now she faces losing the status she worked very hard to reach.  With unemployment what it is, there are people who are struggling.   It's vacation time.  Kids are out of school and families are looking to Marriott for a break. 

     

    Slash room rates and stretch Elite requirements even more.  Keep the largest number of customers engaged, after all they will be the next generation of Elite.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

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