1 Reply Latest reply: Apr 16, 2009 5:23 PM by tjcnewyork RSS

Reason  for declining stays

jdhighroller Platinum
Currently Being Moderated

I have always really enjoyed staying at all the Marriott properties and in the past have actually modified my travel plans to ensure I ended up in a city that had at least one Marriott property if at all possible.  But for the last year plus I have pretty much stopped staying at Marriott properties as they have made it perfectly clear they no longer want my business as a smoker.  I have no issues with not allowing smoking in any public place, but to not offer smoking rooms is just unacceptable to me. I really miss the great service I used to get when staying at Marriott - I have to say they are one of the best hotel chains in the country.

(For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Reason  for declining stays
    tjcnewyork Platinum
    Currently Being Moderated

    JD

     

    Not to single you or any smoker out, I'm stunned by the statement, "I have pretty much stopped staying at Marriott properties as they have made it perfectly clear they no longer want my business as a smoker."  

     

    Nine years and ten days ago, federal legislation was passed prohibiting smoking on all scheduled passenger flights.  It took about 30 years to cross that threshold since the introduction of no-smoking sections in the early 70's. 

     

    Do you no longer choose to fly on regularly scheduled flights with the major carriers because the carriers comply with the law?

     

    Creating a lodging environment that accomodates non-smokers and smokers is not sustainable nor prudent financially.  Accomodating smokers requires separate heating and cooling along with specialized ventilation and air purification not to mention the increased cost of insurance that the risk of fire poses.  The room recovery fee of $250 doesn't even encompass the cost of the health care that associates would incur due to upper respiratory illnesses caused by repeated exposure to second-hand, third-hand smoke, carcinogens and toxins.

     

    From a business perspective - which is the basis of your post - I'm not sure I understand the value proposition in Marriott accomodating smokers.  But, I am open to discussing the subject.  

     

     

    OVER 30 YEARS TO GET NO SMOKING ON PLANES*

    1973: No-smoking sections introduced.

    1979: Cigars and pipes banned on planes.

    1987: Air Canada offers no-smoking flights between New York and Montreal, and reports a reduction in aircraft cleaning costs.

    1988: No-smoking on all U.S. domestic flights under 2 hours.

    1990: No-smoking on all U.S. domestic flights under 6 hours.

    1994: Nonsmoking flight attendants with lung diseases sue seven tobacco companies.

    1997: Flight attendant suit settles: lawyers for attendants get $49 million; tobacco companies get a shelter from future class-actions by attendants; flight attendants with lung diseases get nothing.

    1998: No-smoking on all U.S. domestic flights.

    1999: Japan Airlines bans smoking and offers passengers little plastic tubes to suck on to "help suppress the urge."

    2000: U.S. Federal Law 106-181 sec. 252.3, passed on 4/5/00, took effect in June 2000. It simply says, "All carriers shall prohibit smoking on all scheduled passenger flights."

     

    * Smoking Flights Today

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

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