9 Replies Latest reply: Dec 15, 2014 4:56 PM by lindseyh RSS

Rollover Nights - can someone explain them?

bjones8162 Platinum 1 Reviews
Currently Being Moderated

Could someone explain rollover nights to me?  I am currently Gold, but only will stay ~30 nights this year (2014), so I know I will lose my Gold status.  However, I am anticipating more travel in 2015, so will I have any rollover nights going into 2015 or am I starting at zero?  Confused on how the rollover equation works!

 

Thank you!

(For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Rollover Nights - can someone explain them?
    lindseyh Community Manager Marriott Associate Member
    Currently Being Moderated

    Great question, bjones6290@yahoo.com! I'm going to reach out to the team and get clarification around this, and will let you know what I learn. Thanks for posting!

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Rollover Nights - can someone explain them?
    zukracer Alumni Steward Platinum 4 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    The way it has worked is that you will roll over the nights beyond what your current qualification requires.  So if you are Gold now but only got 30 elite qualified nights, then you will roll over 20 nights for 2015 as Silver is only 10 nights.  I could be wrong but think that's how it works.  Not sure if you have considered the Marriott Chase card, but the black one gives you 15 elite nights a year plus 1 night for every 3k you spend.  Could be enough nights to bump you to gold or platinum but gets you silver regardless

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Rollover Nights - can someone explain them?
    foxglove Silver 3 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    Any nights that rolled over from last year will not roll over again. So your rollover total for 2015 will be your accrued nights above the number required to renew current status minus the number of nights that rolled over from last year. Or at least that's how it's worked in the past.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Rollover Nights - can someone explain them?
    bejacob Platinum 38 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    If you are currently Gold and your status drops to Silver for the new year, you will not get any rollover nights. This happened to me a few years back. I was Gold and had 39 nights. Started the following year at Silver with nothing. The exact wording in the FAQ states that "If a member downgrades to a lower status (e.g., Plat to Gold, Gold to Silver) there would be no rollover nights."

     

    Check out this link for more details https://www.marriott.com/marriott/eliterolloverFAQs.mi

     

    If you were currently Silver, you would get 20 rollover nights (30 - 10 needed to keep your current status) setting you up for an easier push to reach Gold.

     

    On thing you will likely see shortly after the new year. Often there is an opportunity to "buy back" your previous status (the offer probably will come in February and have a deadline around April 30). Typically to remain Gold you would need to spend 25,000 rewards points. You'll still begin the year with no rollover nights, but you wouldn't have to wait to cross the 50 night threshold to reach Gold again. It might be worth it if you will be traveling more in 2015 as you indicate.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Rollover Nights - can someone explain them?
    brightlybob Platinum 10 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    Rollover nights

     

    Any Silver member who at year end has over 10 nights rolls over the excess to the next year.

     

    Any Gold member who at year end has over 50 nights rolls over the excess to the next year

     

    Any Platinum member who at year end has over 75 nights rolls over the excess to the next year

     

    Rollover nights count towards the next years qualification but CANNOT roll over a second time, nor can they be counted to the next years rollover, e.g.:

     

    i) A silver stays 40 nights during 2013. Silver takes 10 nights so the 30 in excess of 10 rolls over. The silver starts 2014 with 30 nights, still a silver but over the course of the next 4 months stays 20 nights, his total is now 50 nights (30 from rollover and 20 from 2014 stays) and becomes Gold. He stays a further 15 nights meaning his counter shows 65 nights at year end BUT ONLY 35 were earned that year, so there is no rollover.

     

    ii) A Gold stays 40 nights in 2012. as he has not stayed the 50 nights required to retain Gold no nights rollover, and he's busted to Silver in Feb 2013. During 2013 he stays 40 nights, so see i) above.

     

    iii) A Plat stays 95 nights in 2013, so rolls over 20 nights to 2014. He stays 70 nights in 2014, thus his counter shows 90 nights, meaning he retains Plat, but as he only stayed 70 nights in 2014, no nights rollover to 2015.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Rollover Nights - can someone explain them?
    lindseyh Community Manager Marriott Associate Member
    Currently Being Moderated

    Spot on, bejacob and brightlybob! Thanks for your helpful responses!

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...