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What does it take to be a local foodie?

kharada46 Alumni Steward Gold 10 Reviews
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Since we're always talking about food, what does it take to be a local foodie where you're from?

 

For Hawaii, see this list:  Local foodie: What you have to eat

I don't entirely agree with it.  I think Spam should be a mandatory item, while beans and heat shouldn't necessarily be.  Poi should also be a harder requirement... not that you have to like it, but have at least tried it more than once

 

Have you tried any of these merb

 

I know you've got an opinion IAHFLYR as our resident grilling expert.  jerrycoin, though not from France, must already be a local food wise. 

 

I'll be very surprised if the great profchiara doesn't have lobster or some type of seafood in her list and if   pluto77 doesn't include some type of taco in hers! 

(For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

Location Brand Hotel
De Soto, Illinois, USA
  • 1. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    jerrycoin Alumni Steward Platinum 60 Reviews
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    KH,

     

    Not from a country I really enjoy, France, but do have wonderful meals wherever I go!

     

    It's my hobby.  Thanks for reminding me.

     

    Had a wonderful meal tonight prepared by a Master Chef in Southern Illinois.  "Tom's Place" is a fabulous place in De Soto, Il.  It is famous for it's great food and is just North of Carbondale, IL.

     

    This place is at least a "Two Star" in France!

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

    Location Brand Hotel
    De Soto, Illinois, USA
  • 2. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    kharada46 Alumni Steward Gold 10 Reviews
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    jerrycoin, you really know how to live! 

     

    When you return to Oahu, you must try these places: 

    Vintage Cave Honolulu - easily a 3 star restaurant it Michelin rated Hawaii

    Chef Mavro - my personal favorite.  Local ingredients; global technique; French flair

    Alan Wong's - The father of Hawaii Regional Cuisine

    Roys Hawaii Kai - The original location, nothing like the ones on the mainland (I've never been)

    La Mer - Traditional French with local ingredients & an amazing view; coat required (never been either, but want to)

    Azure - Amazing, fresh local seafood simply prepared; great service; nice view

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  • 3. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    jerrycoin Alumni Steward Platinum 60 Reviews
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    Kh,

     

    Have been to Roy's and La Mer, both are very, very good!

     

    Thanks for reminding me!

     

    Take care, and keep the good posts coming,

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  • 4. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    tommo781 Gold 8 Reviews
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    Oh food!!!!!!!!!  The raison d'etre in our household.  We do love new restaurants and pubs, and of course our favourite restaurants and pubs which we visit regularly.

     

    We have just returned from a week in London, which is why I haven't been on Insiders recently.  And the food in London is a foodie's heaven.  When we were at West India Quay last December, we returned from a restaurant meal one evening and went into the CL for a peppermint tea.  We were the only people in there apart from the hostess - who was French.  She asked where we had been, and when we told her Le Gavroche, she went into raptures and wanted to know all about it as it was top of her list of restaurants to visit.  She said "London has the best restaurants in the world".  I repeat - she was French - and France is where I have eaten some of the best meals in my life.

     

    London is a foodie heaven.  During this trip we had dinner at Roux @ Parliament Square, and the tasting menu at Le Gavroche, both of which were fabulous.  We also had afternoon tea at The Wolseley which is a wonderful experience.

     

    But as for being a local foodie, we live near the sea in the UK, and the real deal breaker here is fish and chips.  Not any old fish and chips.  It has to be cod or haddock, in light crispy batter, with chips that are not greasy.  Really good fish and chips are to die for.

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  • 5. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    kharada46 Alumni Steward Gold 10 Reviews
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    tommo781, I agree!  There's so many places I wanted to try, alas I only had 20 hours in London during my last visit and was only able to try Petrus by Gordon Ramsay (which was amazing!)

     

    Do still need to try proper fish & chips!  The junk accessible to my in the Aloha State does the traditional British dish absolutely no justice!   

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  • 6. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    profchiara Alumni Steward Silver 3 Reviews
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    Happily, Maine is heavy into 'buy local' nowadays. Now that makes lobsters, scallops and shrimp very easy to come by (lobster is frequently cheaper than scallops or flounder per pound), but we also have a lot of new farmers' markets around the state.  And we have our own home grown 'taste like real' tomatoes thanks to Backyard Farms.

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  • 7. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    jerrycoin Alumni Steward Platinum 60 Reviews
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    Tommo,

     

    You are right on about London food!

     

    Give me:

     

    The Ritz

    The Dorchester

    Gordon Ramsey's

    The Oyster Bar at Harrods

    The Connaught

     

    With some good company, and proper "Spirits", and you are in for a "Culinary Heaven"!

     

    What's amazing in London is that you can find those wonderful pubs that serve fantastic food at a fraction of those prices as well!

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  • 8. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    iahflyr Platinum 26 Reviews
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    Down here in Texas we love us some BBQ.  I'm not much into the beef however; the chicken and pork put in a taco with home made salsa, guacamole and some jalapenos can't be beat.  Well maybe just by the Tarheel state of N.C. where I spent some time, pulled pork oh yeah!

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  • 9. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    madmax Gold 7 Reviews
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    kharada46 I would have to say in OK it is meat and tators, any way, shape or form. Of course everything has to be fried, fried and fried. And Mexican restaurants/dishes are very prevalent in the state. I myself will eat anything and the spicier the better in most cases. Beef is very popular and we have many steak houses but the best overall is Cattleman's in the heart of OKC's Packing Town with Black Angus steaks.

    Another popular dish in OK and probably most of the south is "Chicken Fried Steak". Chicken fried you ask? What could that be? Well, it is beef but it is breaded and fried like Chicken and ooooooohhh so good. Too good actually. And it has to be smothered in white gravy with a big pile of mashed potatoes. Well, now that the cholesterol is up to highest levels possible, move on to pot roast, preferably chuck roast (beef again) and a yellow onion (preferably sweet Vidalia) cooked in an electric skillet which makes its own gravy. When roast is done add quartered potatoes and carrots. Oh my, is anyone hungry yet? I shouldn't be talking about this at 9:30 in the morning. I am going to be starving before lunch time rolls around.

    Thanks for the post. It is interesting to see what different parts of the country have as specialties.

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  • 10. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    foxglove Silver 3 Reviews
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    Here in Georgia, good eating begins with soul food, traditional Southern foods with strong African-American influences. Favorites include fried chicken, fried catfish, vegetables such as greens (usually collards), butter beans, field peas, Vidalia onions (either deep-fried rings or baked whole), fried okra, summer squash, fried green tomatoes, and corn (often in the form of grits). And cornbread is the quintessential Southern bread.

     

    BBQ (usually pork) and chicken mull often serve as the basis for family gatherings and group get-togethers. Along the coast, shrimp and Brunswick stew are omnipresent.

     

    For snacking, nosh on some Georgia peanuts, either roasted or boiled, some big ol' Georgia pecans (correctly pronounced PEA-cans), or a bag of pork rinds.

     

    For dessert, it's peach or blueberry cobbler, apple or pecan pie, or pralines. In recent years, blueberries have overtaken peaches as Georgia's most valuable fruit crop, more than tripling the income produced by peach growers. Climate change has made it difficult for peaches to obtain the number of hours below 45 degrees required to bloom.

     

    Finally, for beverages, it's sweet tea (iced, of course), Coke (correctly pronounced (Co-cola), or something clear (hopefully) and medicinal, sipped from a mason jar. White lightnin' is usually corn squeezin's, but apple brandy, IMO, is the way to go.

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  • 11. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    madmax Gold 7 Reviews
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    there we go with the fried, fried and more fried foxglove

    oh yes, we have to have our sweet tea and when I say sweet, I mean SWEEEEEEEEET!

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  • 12. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    foxglove Silver 3 Reviews
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    Ya just gotta work off all the "fried." Hard eatin' and hard exercise -- that's the key.

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  • 13. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    tommo781 Gold 8 Reviews
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    Foxglove, I have been to Georgia, so perhaps you will explaing something to me.  What is this Mason jar thing?  Over here in the UK we call them Kilner jars, and use them for storing food.  Why are they used as drinking vessels in Georgia?

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  • 14. Re: What does it take to be a local foodie?
    madmax Gold 7 Reviews
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    In the US, "Mason" jars (that was original company that created Ball/Mason jars) are used for everything. Drinking is one of the most popular but people craft with them. They are prevalent at craft stores to use for gift giving such as hot chocolate mix, 5 bean soups, layers of colored sand, cookie mixes, etc. My store chain I work for sells about 48,000 pint jars and 50,000 quart jars per month on average. They are a big deal here in the US. As for drinking, the quart size hold enough you don't have to keep refilling all the time

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