6 Replies Latest reply: Jan 2, 2014 2:58 PM by scottbany1974 RSS

Hotel Designs for potential market segment (Boomers)

erc Platinum
Currently Being Moderated

With all of the understandable and justifiable attention chains are throwing toward attracting the Millennial market, here's the third article I've seen in the past few weeks about an awakening market, The Boomer Leisure Market (to be differentiated from the business boomer traveler - you'll get what the Millennials want, and you'll like it ).

 

Here are two segments that stood out to me:
Jacqueline McGee, principal at Boston-based architectural firm CBT, is leading the team designing the new Sofitel Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C. She and her colleagues specified electric mirrors in bathrooms as a way to make boomers look younger and better. In addition, CBT suggested softer, more subtle lighting throughout the property. "It's just as way of making older people feel good about themselves," McGee said.
I hope   vaboywnder , kharada46 ks77 zukracer  sg1974  and the rest of the forum's dynamos don't think we really value Snow White type mirrors (although I've noticed I am cuter in the moonlight).  Besides, I hear what you're saying, "shouldn't the designers focus on putting in, 'help I've fallen and I can't get up' buttons"?
And then this encouraging note - so who knows, as the saying goes, "everything old is new again", perhaps if we live long enough, boomers will be back in vogue.
"Such attempts to cause a boomer to select one hotel over another in the future will continue to gain traction, Munoz said. The market segment is growing daily and will continue to add enthusiastic, often affluent travelers to the leisure market.  The market is so big that it will become more important".

 

Have a Happy New Year Insiders, I'm off for my Debby Boone Lifestyle Lift session .

(For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: Hotel Designs for potential market segment (Boomers)
    superchief1 Platinum
    Currently Being Moderated

    I think one thing that is often ignored in following trends and targeting specific generations is that generalities don't often translate into business opportunities. In my experience, when traveling on business, many Millenials have similar priorities as Boomers for hotel requirements. Additionally, it is amazing to see how similar different generations become as they advance through lfestages. Many of us rebellious 'Boomers' became a lot more like our parents as we added responsibilities and commitments.

     

    One of my highest priorities has always been a quiet room. Paper thin walls, loud corridors, noisy AC's, road/airport/highway noise cause me to check a hotel off my list. I have experienced noisy conditions in all chains and levels, and it seems to me that walls continue to get thinner. Additionally, the more active public areas targeting Millenials can create noise problems throughout the hotel. As a business traveler, my highest priority is a good night's sleep and I think most business and leisure travelers share this desire.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

    • Re: Hotel Designs for potential market segment (Boomers)
      lakersfan Platinum 20 Reviews
      Currently Being Moderated

      superchief1 I really concur that a quiet room is a top priority for me.  I really like the Las Vegas Renaissance hotel, but the walls are "paper thin."  I have had two very bad nights there until I wrote down the room numbers that are next to the stairways, elevators and fire walls.  They are much quieter.  I also will generally not stay in a room with a connecting door because the noise from the adjacent room can often be heard through the connecting door(s), even if not loud.  Years ago I learned to also be aware of rooms facing a highway.  I have spent many nights at the Springfield MA Marriott and will not accept a room facing the elevated highway - they are too noisy.  I could go on-and-on about noise from other rooms.  It has caused me a number of sleepless nights when traveling for business.

      (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

      • Re: Hotel Designs for potential market segment (Boomers)
        jerryl Platinum 2 Reviews
        Currently Being Moderated

        I would agree with you. I put in my profile to get a high floor as I have stayed in NYC a lot and garbage trucks are out very early so I figure if I don't know the hotel layout a high floor away from the elevator seemed to help

        (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

        • Re: Hotel Designs for potential market segment (Boomers)
          Platinum 28 Reviews
          Currently Being Moderated

          jerryl

           

          In total agreement - my profile also requests high floor to avoid traffic sounds.  There is no concern (other than general comfort) than noise outside a property.

           

          As far as inside goes - maybe we should start a discussion on making some floors "adults only" to avoid screaming children running up and down the hallways arguing who gets to use the hotel key!!!!!

          (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

      • Re: Hotel Designs for potential market segment (Boomers)
        superchief1 Platinum
        Currently Being Moderated

        I agree that high floors and no connecting rooms really help. I am also amazed at the differences between hotels regarding soundproofing from outside noise, especially hotels near airports/trains and in cities. Most Marriott properties are pretty good. I stayed in a room at the Embassy Suites in Walnut Creek that was just above the BART line and noise was unbearable. I mentioned this to the front desk and they informed me the hotel owners didn't want to spend the money to install more soundproof windows. That was my last stay at that hotel. The Renaissance Club Sport is located nearbye and their rooms are very quiet and service is usually exceptional, in addition to having access to a world class fitness club. 

        (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

        • Re: Hotel Designs for potential market segment (Boomers)
          Member
          Currently Being Moderated

          I agree that high floors and no connecting rooms really help. I am also amazed at the differences between hotels regarding soundproofing from outside noise, especially hotels near airports/trains and…

          (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

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