7 Replies Latest reply: Dec 18, 2013 3:56 AM by kharada46 RSS

15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's

eb5147 Alumni Steward Platinum 7 Reviews
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15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's

 

By Chuck Thompson, CNN
updated 2:18 AM EST, Fri February 8, 2013
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Don't guilt family and friends into hanging on to gifts you wouldn't want No items you wouldn't want to get or wouldn't proudly display in your own home.
  • Avoid shopping at the airport
  • Plush toys and designer sea salt are out
  • Are you really sure they want that scorpion alcohol?
  • No leftover foreign coins as "souvenirs" or collectibles. This is worse than giving nothing, because it shows how lazy you are.    (I like them.)
  • No athletic jerseys, caps or visors. Especially visors. And Beckham. And Messi.
  • No Eiffel Towers, Statues of Liberties, Mt. Rushmores, Taj Mahals, Aussie koalas, Chairman Maos or anything that would fit perfectly in the back of a closet or bottom of a drawer.
  • No key chains, coasters, mugs or plates. And, whatever you do, no double-whammy Eiffel Tower key chains.
  • No more little bags of rock, black, sea or flavored salt. The whole designer salt thing is done.
  • No bottles filled with sand, coral bits, shells or pebbles.
  • No items that require assembly, watering, sunlight, maintenance, lubrication or refrigeration. Or excessive explanation.
  • No "I (heart)" anything. Even if you do.
  • No books. We believe you, it was an amaaaaaazing art exhibit. We just don't have 37 hours to spend reading about it.
  • No traditional ethnic clothing for non-ethnics.
  • No plastic leis.


Got a favorite souvenir do or don't? Ever received a terrible souvenir? A great one? Share your souvenir experiences in the comments section.

(For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: 15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's
    bejacob Platinum 38 Reviews
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    I tend to travel more than many of my co-workers and several of them like small souvenirs from my trips. One always wants a magnet (easy enough, but I did once buy at the airport). Another collects Hard Rock Cafe bears (which breaks the plush toy rule). Another friend specifically asks me to bring an interesting rock (about fist-sized) from wherever I go (a freebie, but I think it breaks at least one rule).

     

    The key for all of these is that my friends have asked for these things. I'd never want to give them something they wouldn't like.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: 15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's
    pluto77 Alumni Steward Gold 25 Reviews
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    Very good post, Eb.  Like Be, I travel a lot, most of my co-workers (computer users) rarely.  When I started traveling several years ago, I was bringing back all kinds of - pardon my French - ****, like the Eiffel Tower key chains and Mona Lisa pens.  I also made the mistake of bringing back something to each of my colleagues, which caught on, as now they all do the same.  As a result, we all have a veritable shrine of junk from each other (a paper flower from the Pope's visit to Mexico City, an acorn and sea shell from Croatia, chocolate covered Maca nuts from Hawaii, maple syrup from Canada, magic fairy dust from the Magic Kingdom - well, there's a private joke to that one, rows of magnets and the list goes on), all of which will be tossed whence I retire.  No one asks for anything (though if they did I would attempt to accommodate) and I finally learned my lesson, even to the extent that I rarely purchase for the g-littles - an exception would be books from the Smithsonian children's book store.  After buying overpriced plush camels in Dubai earlier this year for my g-littles, I bought nothing for them in Sydney.  They'll play with it for a day and then it will be forgotten.  I don't even purchase but a rare souvenir for myself anymore (last one was a hand carved wooden bracelet made by a university student in Prague, nothing expensive, but I will fondly remember the trip each time I wear the bracelet.  It didn't break the bank and more importantly, didn't take up space in my luggage.)

     

    The best souvenirs are the memories we make along the way, the connections made and perhaps a few photos (or a thousand ) to document the experiences.  In Bejacob's case, it's postcards, and right on!

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: 15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's
    pluto77 Alumni Steward Gold 25 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    Just one more thought/observation... If there is something I just have to have (like say a Sydney Opera House ball cap for our concert band director or a coffee mug for another friend), I will always purchase these things from the actual store within the publicly funded attraction itself, rather than from Joe Blow's souvenir stand on the sidewalk or corner, even though it will cost over twice as much, because the funds spent in the store (for instance inside the National Archives) helps to keep these important places of historical, cultural and national/world significance funded; my souvenir $$ better spent.

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

    • Re: 15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's
      eb5147 Alumni Steward Platinum 7 Reviews
      Currently Being Moderated

      Those are both really good posts, pluto77 .  Thanks for the thoughts.

       

      I buy lots of postcards like bejacob, usually getting them at the best buy in multiples, whatever that is.

       

      In Yellowstone Nat'l Park, I donated to the park society and got a buffalo.  I like it and the cups I bought at the end of season sale at the lodge at Old Faithful.  I bought 2 and broke one.  It's HUGE and my son looked them up and found they were considered collectibles.  A cheap little plastic Yellowstone snow globe with a buffalo grazing is in the scene and the bottom was broken in a place when I bought it at clearance, but I like playing with it anyway.

       

      A friend brought me spoons from places she'd been, so I started collecting them when I saw one I liked.

       

      Tee shirts and sweat shirts I've bought from a destination are hardly ever worn, so they're out.

       

      I was thinking that your office might decorate a tree with all of your mementos that have been collected to at least put them to use?  

      (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

  • Re: 15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's15 biggest souvenir-buying no-no's
    kharada46 Alumni Steward Gold 10 Reviews
    Currently Being Moderated

    This is a great post with lots of great advice from all!  Though I don't really follow this rule myself... My maternal grandparents love figurine type stuff or artwork (they have a lot of carvings and what not) that represents a place visited, so I always buy them say a figuring of the Eiffel Tower or of the Colosseum, etc.  I guess it just really depends on the person. 

     

    Oh, and in Tokyo, at NRT, I enjoyed shopping at the airport!  Found some weird snacks to bring back... shoyu or kinako Kit-Kat Bars anyone? 

    (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

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