11 Replies Latest reply: Sep 23, 2012 6:18 AM by arkwright RSS

A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month

arkwright Platinum 2 Reviews
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Where, and why, might Jerry Coin be 1 out of 42 million?

 

A

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  • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
    erc Platinum
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    He's one of the 42 million owners of The Pub Guide of Great Britain, an annual award handed out by Arkwright to worthy recipients, who post terrific photos and travel insights.

    He watched the Olympics opening ceremonies from one of them, perhaps The Grenadier.

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  • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
    painedplatinum Platinum 2 Reviews
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    I'll try Ark..... Jerry is one of the 42 million visitors to Paris each year. So, he contributes to making it the most visited city in the World.

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  • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
    jerrycoin Alumni Steward Platinum 60 Reviews
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    arkwright,

     

    Thanks for the plug on a great book!  I have used the book many times and it's come in handy.

     

    Am currently visiting St. Joseph, Mo., "The home of The Pony Express".  A most interesting place, also famous for Jesse James last days!

     

    Thanks also for the information from PP on Paris, I had no idea so many people visited Paris. 

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    • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
      arkwright Platinum 2 Reviews
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      Jerry, erc and Pp,

       

      I must confess:

       

      a) Not to have agreed to donate a copy of The Pub Guide annually to "worthy recipients" but not because I am too mean (), or because I've not detected any "worthies"; rather only because I never thought of it. Henceforth, if MR arrange the distribution, I will happily provide the book - and you three can be the judges!

       

      b) Also to have been surprised by the sheer size of annual count of visitors to Paris; it is the world's largest tourist attraction by some margin. I was there last week-end for a big (horse) race meeting and, walking along the great thoroughfares, it was impossible not to sense the magnetic attraction of the place - even in these days of austerity.

       

      I was fascinated by Jerry's mention of "The Pony Express" and Jesse James. Are these names celebrated much in the town/city itself - e.g. museums, naming rights to the local jail?

       

      Best,

       

      A

      (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

      • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
        jerrycoin Alumni Steward Platinum 60 Reviews
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        arkwright,

         

        I would trade you Paris for St. Joseph!  La Tour Agent dining instead of McDonalds?

         

        Yes, they take their history and tourist spots serious here and I don't think this town has changed all that much throughout time.  Here are a few photo's you may enjoy:IMG_2264.JPG

        This is a tapestry of a famous US Postage Stamp displayed at a local non-Marriott hotel.  They are no Marriott properties in the area.

        IMG_2283.JPG

        IMG_2277.JPG

        This is a most interesting Pony Express Museum!

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        • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
          lone6star Platinum 3 Reviews
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          Onc again, you have provided us with some great pics!

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        • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
          arkwright Platinum 2 Reviews
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          Jerry,

           

          Many thanks for your images and references to St Joseph. They were fascinating in themselves - for example, I had no idea that the Pony Express existed for only 18 months, but that, by contrast, Jesse James, went on for more than 20 years. Some of the accounts of early Express riders' trips - like that Billy Tate, 14 yo, in the middle of a Paiute War, and of course William Cody - are truly the stuff of legends. They also convey a sense of what "frontier America" was like; we have little, if any, parallels here - even in Scotland.

           

          The challenge of transport, over such vast areas, particularly interests me. Down the road from where I'm writing this is the Liverpool Road Station..........on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway which opened on 15 September 1830. The station was the Manchester terminus of the world's first inter-city passenger railway in which all services were hauled by timetabled steam locomotives . It is now the world's oldest surviving terminal railway station.

           

          The distance involved was little more than 30 miles; from St Joseph to San Francisco - the first Pony Express run -  well over 1000 miles.

           

          Last year, I read a Pulitzer winning biography of Cornelius Vanderbilt, whose vision and energy - applied firstly to river steamers, then ocean-going paddle ships, and only then to establishing the USA's rail network - is again extraordinary. His "hands-on, no-holds-barred, yet strangely honourable" approach to making  money seems a million miles from today's sanitised world of investment banking.

           

          Where will your travels take you next? More legends perhaps?

           

          Best,

           

          A

           

          Liverpool Road railway station, Manchester.jpg

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          • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
            jerrycoin Alumni Steward Platinum 60 Reviews
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            arkwright,

             

            Thanks for the information and the picture.  A great trivia question, that I certainly had no idea about the famous train station.  Likewise, Vanderbilt was so ahead of his time.  His story will make for another interesting "Travel story".

             

            Nest week on to Cleveland and Niagara Falls, should be a good one as I have taken MI advice on The Fallsview Marriott in Canada.  Am really looking forward to the experience.

             

            Here is a picture or two of St. Joseph, that you might enjoy.

            IMG_2269.jpg

            IMG_2273.jpg

            arkwright, what is an English Baronet?

            IMG_2279.JPG

            IMG_2288.jpg

            IMG_2287.JPG

            IMG_2280.JPG

            A whole lot of history in this Missouri "River town", thanks for your interest!

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            • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
              arkwright Platinum 2 Reviews
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              Jerry,

               

              I happened to be "on-line" when your query came through.

               

              You might think that a straightforward question would result in a straightforward answer; but not so! I started to draft a response, but rapidly

              realised that, to give you a full and correct answer, I'd need to take advice from an expert. Step forward, Burke's Peerage:

               

              "BRITISH TITLES - BARONET

               

              baronet: holder of a hereditary title of honour called a baronetcy. This title is unique to the kingdoms of the British Isles that since the 17th century have at different times merged to form the United Kingdom. The collective name for baronets is baronetage, though this can also mean a reference book listing holders of baronetcies (e.g., Burke's Peerage & Baronetage). The order of baronets was invented by JAMES I to raise money. Nominally this was for the upkeep of military forces in Ireland, hence the badge of the Red Hand of Ulster featuring as a baronet's device (except in the case of Nova Scotia creations (see below), where the saltire (see Heraldic Glossary) of Ulster was used instead). At the same time the Red Hand is not invariably shown in a baronet's coat of arms. It was made clear at the time that no order should henceforth be called into existence that was of equal or higher degree than the baronetage yet beneath the lowest rank of peerage. 

              Many baronets have subsequently been created peers, but the order is wholly distinct from both the knightage (see knight) and the peerage (2) as can be shown by the fact that the 1st and last Lord Barrett of Newburgh was made a baronet after being created a peer. Baronets were originally given the right to be knighted, which would make no sense if they were merely, as is sometimes wrongly asserted, hereditary knights. They also once had the right to have their eldest sons knighted on the latter attaining their majority, a privilege which was bestowed by JAMES I in 1616 after candidates dried up following his ruling that baronets' precedence should be lower than that of barons' younger sons but which was rescinded by GEORGE IV in 1827.

              Nevertheless as late as 1842 Sir Richard Broun, 8th Bt (qv), who did not succeed to his father's baronetcy till 1844, started calling himself Sir Richard Broun on the grounds that the right of a baronet's heir apparent to be knighted had not lapsed, though the Lord Chancellor of the day had declined to bring him before QUEEN VICTORIA to be dubbed when he had petitioned for the honour back in 1836. Broun had two years previous even to that occasion tried to get the order to which his father belonged granted certain privileges, among them the right of all baronets to wear a neck badge, one that had been extended back in 1629, but to Nova Scotia baronets only. Although Broun has been widely ridiculed (by no one more than Disraeli, who put him in Sybil as the absurd Sir Vavasour Firebrace), his campaign was not wholly unsuccessful. In 1854 Sir John Kingston James, who was to succeed his father as 2nd Baronet 15 years later (see 1970 edn JAMES, Bt), was knighted, specifically as a baronet's eldest son. In 1874, Ludlow, eldest son of Sir James Cotter, 4th Bt (qv), was knighted on coming of age. (He predeceased his father by 20 years, dying unmarried in 1882.) But when in 1895 Claude, the eldest son of Sir Claude de Crespigny, 4th Bt (see 1949 edn), petitioned to be knighted he was turned down, Lastly, in 1929 Broun won his most significant, if posthumous, victory when all baronets were accorded their own neck badge.

              The baronetage of England dates from 22 May 1611, that of Ireland from the following 30 September, that of Nova Scotia or Scotland (so called in the former case because the moneys raised were supposed to go towards establishing the colony of Nova Scotia in North America and applicants received a land grant there; the grants were stopped in 1638) from 28 May 1625, that of Great Britain following the Union of English and Scottish Parliaments in 1707 and that of the United Kingdom following the Union of Parliaments of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801. Nearly all baronetcies are heritable by and through males only. The exceptions are a handful in the baronetage of Nova Scotia, for example the one held (but not used) by the Labour MP Tam Dalyell (qv). There is no mechanism for formally renouncing a baronetcy in the way there is for a peerage (1).

              In the 19th century the custom grew up of conferring baronetcies on distinguished men who were deemed by Victorian convention not quite worthy of a peerage, usually because of their calling rather than because of lack of wealth, Engineers were one group frequently so honoured. The other chief group was members of the medical profession, whereas lawyers, who were also members of a profession, tended to be honoured, where they were honoured at all, with peerages. It also became the custom to confer a baronetcy on Lord Mayors of London. The last person so honoured was Sir Ralph Perring in 1963.

              An Official Roll of the Baronetage is kept up by the Home Office. Anyone who wishes to be officially recognised as a baronet must prove his succession, as with peers. A royal warrant of 8 February 1910 decreed that no person should be received as a baronet or addressed or mentioned by that title in any civil or military commission, letters patent or any other official document unless his name figured on the Official Roll. "

               

              The reference to being "not quite worthy of a peerage" is fascinating, carrying as it does a sense of how important, yet subtle, were the social distinctions that characterised Victorian England - many of which survive today!

               

              A

              (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

              • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
                jerrycoin Alumni Steward Platinum 60 Reviews
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                arkwright,

                 

                Wow, one does learn something new every day!

                 

                I will make it a point to find the name of the Baronet on my next trip.  Thanks so much for the information!  Here's a couple more photo's of this most interesting place, Mt. Mora.  People are just "Dieing to get into there"!

                IMG_2272.jpg

                IMG_2274.jpg

                Confederate States Monument.

                IMG_2275.jpg

                In honor of WW1,  General Pershing was from Missouri, as was Walt Disney, Mark Twain and Harry Truman.

                There are no Marriott's close by, with the nearest being the Kansas City Airport, about 30 miles away.

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                • Re: A "pub quiz" question - in celebration of August's Steward of the Month
                  arkwright Platinum 2 Reviews
                  Currently Being Moderated

                  Jerry,

                   

                  I'd be interested to know the identity of that "baronet"; you might find that his was self-awarded!

                   

                  Many thanks for the additional pics. How far away are you from Fulton and the famous school gymnasium? I have long believed that the USA "does" its history very well - and one of the reasons is that its surviving manifestations aren't all clustered in the same place as tends to be the case in those European nations that opted for relatively centralised forms of governments - France, GB, Spain. Thank you, Thomas Jefferson.

                   

                  I'm sitting looking at a newspaper image entitled "Museum Elevator, St Louis (2008) - part of a collection of colour pictures by Michael Eastman ( not a coincidence, surely?) of escalators, elevators, tunnels and metallic walls across Asia and North America. included in his series "Urban Luminosity". Apparently, he captured these scenes after dark - using long exposures, often more than 10 mins - so that it was difficult to imagine how the resulting images would turn out.So much for art as a representational form!

                   

                  Fascinating stuff - but sadly for you the collection is currently on show - until 20th October - not in SL, but in a New York gallery. Still you might be travelling that way.....

                   

                  Best,

                   

                  A

                  (For each location tag, you will be guided through a 3-step process to add (1) a city and a state or a city and a country, (2) a Marriott brand, and (3) a Marriott hotel.)

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